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Swell Things No. 20

February 28, 2015 by Erin Fletcher

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1. Israeli artist Ron Arad’s obsession with the Fiat 500 began when he father was almost struck while driving one. This recent installation series put on by the artist exhibits a collection of flattened Fiats, which was achieved by using the metal press at a shipyard to crush each car to 12cm thick. The results are just surprisingly stunning.
2. The Last of the Teddy Girls is a collection of photographs from Ken Russell portraying the girl gang subculture and their male counterparts in a post-war London of the 1950s. The portraits are a magnificent representation feminine style and independence.
3. I’m really loving these brilliant and colorful collages from artist Anna Ovni; could perhaps inspire a future leather design binding.
4. Check out this beautifully illustrated 15th century manuscript of Claudius Ptolomaeus’ Cosmographia.
5. I’m always intrigued when artists introduce unusual materials into their work. Alison Foshee illustrated a series of fauna using staples because in her words was the best way to highlight the contour of various plant life.

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6. Xylotheks: an object where the container is a fundamental component of its contents. In this case, the wooden book boxes store wooden objects. These objects were particularly popular in Germany in the late 18th to early 19th centuries. Xylotheks are a surprising discovery for me and are quite interesting objects.
7. Every year new words are added to the dictionary, so it only makes sense that new hand gestures would make their way into American Sign Language. Read the fascinating article and see the signs that represent words or phrases like: selfie, photobomb, and food coma.
8. Charles Young is the paper engineer behind Paperholm: a growing paper city. The best part is that many of these miniature building models are animated. I love the detail and quirkiness behind the project.
9. I recently stumbled upon this phenomenon referred to as kawaii cuisine coming out of both Japan and Denmark. Each of these cooks are creating itty bitty foods using plastic doll cooking equipment and candles to cook the food. Reality can be a bit bizarre some times.
10. In the early 1900s, Thomas Cobden-Sanderson threw 2,600lbs of his bespoke typeface Doves Type into the Thames. For the past three years designer Robert Green has been trying to recreate this lost typeface. After thorough research, Green discovered the spot where the coveted type was tossed into the murky waters. Green was able to uncover a total of 150 pieces, just a small portion, but enough to help him finish the digital version.


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  • Visit My Bindery
    My name is Erin Fletcher and I live in Boston working as a Bookbinder.  This blog is an extension of Herringbone Bindery where I can share my inspirations with you.
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