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Posts Tagged ‘hook pottery paper’

  1. Swell Things No. 48 // Maine, Michigan and Texas

    June 30, 2018 by Erin Fletcher

    For the past three months, I’ve been traveling to teach and have visited some incredible spaces and met really talented people. So in this Swell Things post, I’ll introduce you to a few.

    1. In May, I taught at the Paper and Book Intensive which was hosted by the Ox-Bow School of Art in Saugatuk, Michigan. This is a really unique space built near a lagoon that flows into Lake Michigan. The camp ground is filled with a variety of buildings set up for paper making, printmaking, painting, ceramics and glassblowing. All of the participants are housed on the grounds and we meet at the Ox Bow Inn for meals and social events. I highly recommend making the trip to Saugatuk for either PBI or to attend a workshop at Ox-Bow. It’s a fantastic way to unplug, relax and be creative.
    2. In April, I taught a workshop at the University of Southern Maine in Portland. And although my schedule hindered me from visiting PrintCraft, I didn’t want to miss this opportunity to tell you about it. PrintCraft is the combined studios of W.I.P. Editions and Strong Arm Bindery in Portland’s West End. Sharing equipment, experience and expertise in the fields of printmaking, bookbinding and letterpress printing, co-owners Lisa Pixley and Martha Kearsley produce an array of prints, printed matter and ever-evolving experiments in stationery. PrintCraft studio storefront is open Tuesday – Sunday from 12:00-6:00pm.
    3. At PBI, I met a delightful and talented ceramicist by the name of Gabrielle Soltis. She set up shop one evening and I walked away with this gorgeous speckled paste bowl and a handmade mug for my morning coffee.
    4. Before teaching in College Station, Texas, I made a stop in Austin to visit family. But I also made a visit to Flatbed Press and Gallery, which was founded in 1989 by Katherine Brimberry and Mark L. Smith. The space functions as a publishing workshop open for artists to produce large-scale limited editions prints. They are set up to create etchings, lithographs, woodcuts and monoprints. While walking through the studio, two large woodcuts had just been inked up and were ready to print. The inking took a little over an hour!
    5. During my time at PBI, I got to meet the extraordinarily smart, talented and hilarious Béatrice Coron. She works primarily in Tyvek creating “cut stories” by slicing away the material to reveal intricate scenes. Her work exists as flat pieces of art and wearable garments. In fact she wore a beautiful silver and black Tyvek jacket during her evening presentation. She has also designed fencing, sculptures and art for public spaces.

    6. I met Carey Watters at PBI and we spent an evening chatting about our art, our family and our love of travel. Her paper reliquaries are quite magnificent and her approach to paper cut sculptures is fresh and exciting.
    7. Vintage Marüshka fabric prints from the 1970s and 80s were scattered throughout the Ox-Bow Inn. The one pictured above was my favorite and is located in the bathroom inside the dining hall. I was able to find an authentic Marüshka cat print from 1983 that is hanging above my bookcase.
    8. I am a ceramic fanatic and when Jon Hook came out to PBI to sell some of his pieces, I jumped at the opportunity. I was in awe of so many of his vessels and mugs, but I ended up walking away with this tiny ceramic pig.
    9. Before visiting Flatbed, I made a stop at the Austin Book Arts Center (which happens to be in the same building). Mary Baughman gave me a tour of the bindery and their newly added print shop. The space is cozy and well loved. Every inch of their space is well designed to really maximize the potential of the room. They will be celebrating their third birthday in September, if you’re in the area, stop by for their auction!
    10. During one of the last few days at PBI, the resident artists opened their studios for touring. This is when I got to meet fellow School of the Art Institute alum, Noël Morical. Using macrame, Noël creates these massive hanging sculptures with bright parachute cord. She also had on display some smaller wall hangings, that to me, resembled alien-like sea creatures. I hope to own a piece one day!

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  2. Bonus // Bookbinder of the Month: Monique Lallier

    May 25, 2014 by Erin Fletcher

    LaLune1-MoniqueLallier

    As much as I would like to feature every single binding from Monique Lallier’s portfolio, the month as finally come to an end. But I thought I’d sneak in one last binding to leave you in awe.

    La Lune was recently bound by Monique using dark blue smooth goatskin from Steven Siegel with matching edge to edge doublures. The endpapers perfectly match the design and title of the book. The ‘moon’ paper came from Andrea Peterson of Hook Pottery Paper.

    Throughout the month we’ve looked at your hidden panel bindings which offer a distinct element to your work and unique movement to the structure. We’ve also looked at bindings that include depth and texture through the use of laser cutting or lacunose. With the binding for La Lune you really bring together movement and texture in such a brilliant and unique way. What can you tell us about the concept for the binding and how the rotation of the moon was constructed?
    La Lune was a commission from an artist friend. I wanted to have texture for the full moon so I choose egg shells of different tones of blue to white. The crescent are of white shells, the new moon is of black vellum that has some gray tone in it. I had the circles laser cut. I cut a channel in each circle for the metal rod and put it in place before covering. From the inside of the boards I cut another channel, longer at the top than the bottom one so I could push the rod up until I could adjust it in the bottom channel. The rod has to stay free to allow the rotation.

    LaLune2-MoniqueLallier LaLune3-MoniqueLallier LaLune4-MoniqueLallierLaLune5-MoniqueLallier LaLune6-MoniqueLallier


  3. January // Book Artist of the Month: Mary Uthuppuru

    January 2, 2014 by Erin Fletcher

    AndThenThereWere8_3-MaryUthuppuru

    In preparation for their 2013 Annual Open House and Silent Auction, the Morgan Conservatory presented participants with two sheets of paper made at the Morgan and asked them to create a piece of art to be auctioned off during the event. Mary Uthuppuru was given one sheet of charcoal grey and the other of bright white.

    Mary found inspiration from the recent drop Pluto experienced from its rank as a planet and the heated discussions that followed. As the sole character in this artist book, Mary personifies the now dwarf planet in the form of a letter, where Pluto freely express himself after hearing this news of rejection. You can read more about Mary’s process in her blog post, Poor Pluto

    And Then There Were Eight is bound as an accordion with a removable spine piece, when fully opened the viewer can experience the vast and expanding qualities of outer space. The covers are most appropriately wrapped in beautiful handmade Moon Paper from Hook Pottery Paper. The paper appears to be a 3-dimensional print of the moon, but it is actually smooth (like paper). The interior pages were given an airbrush look by using a mouth atomizer and drawing inks.

    AndThenThereWere8-MaryUthuppuruAndThenThereWere8_4-MaryUthuppuruAndThenThereWere8_2-MaryUthuppuruI really enjoyed reading about your thought process behind this book. Not only did you find inspiration in a literary influence, but also in your own sense of humor. The application of pigment really captures the atmosphere and depth of space. Can you talk about the challenges and benefits to using a mouth atomizer?
    The mouth atomizer was a really fun thing to use. I actually had it for over ten years before I discovered its use during this project. It looks a lot like a compass, but without the pencil. One end goes into whatever liquid you are using (in the case of the Pluto book it was India ink and Winsor & Newton drawing ink) and then you blow on the other tube.

    The benefit in its use is also its challenge. So long as you have the lung capacity, this tool is very simple. Blow in the horizontal tube, and the ink is sprayed from the vertical tube. The difficulty is in style. If you are trying to get consistent coverage, then you have to be consistent with the pressure behind your breath. But it is easy to get used to with a practice piece of paper. Also, beware your work space. Cover anything surrounding the piece you are working on with newsprint or other waste unless you want a speckled work space.

    ThereWere8_Atomizer-MaryUthuppuru

    There is more than one way to use it too. In this book, for example, I cut stencils from transparency sheets to create the planetary bodies. This allowed for a clean, shaded shape that is much faster and reads truer than a traditional stippling stenciled technique. It is also easy to clean by running it under water then drying.

    ThereWere8_Stenciling-MaryUthuppuru

    I first met Mary in Chicago for the One Book, Many Interpretations exhibit at the Chicago Public Library, where both Mary and I had work in the show. I’ll be featuring her binding of Interpreter of Maladies from that show later this month. From the beginning, I noted Mary’s impeccable skill and her exceptional eye for detail, but I can’t forget to mention her infectious personality. Her humor mixed with kindness and generosity makes her a delightful person to engage with and learn from.

    Like myself, Mary, is just beginning her career in the field of bookbinding. Her ambition and creativity are inspiring, as is the interview (after the jump). Mary discusses her love for bookbinding and how she caught “the book bug”. Later in the interview, Mary talks about setting up her own home studio and how being self-employed has its ups and downs. But it’s quite clear to see that Mary tackles her obstacles with smarts and humor. 

    Come back each Monday during the month of January for more on Mary Uthuppuru and her work, which will bounce between bookbinding and book arts.

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  • Visit My Bindery
    My name is Erin Fletcher and I live in Boston working as a Bookbinder.  This blog is an extension of Herringbone Bindery where I can share my inspirations with you.
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