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  1. Artist: Miranda Crooks

    February 14, 2017 by Erin Fletcher

    Using double-exposure, Miranda Crooks has created these dreamlike images of plants. The photographic effect and the rich, vibrant colors pull you away from reality. In her watercolor pieces, Miranda uses a softer palette to capture the essence of each plant.


  2. Artist: Johanna Goodman

    January 10, 2017 by Erin Fletcher

    The Imaginary Beings series from Johanna Goodman are delightful and witty. Through her collages, she is able to create so much emotion (and attitude) by playing with character’s facial expressions and posture. Plus some ultra-fabulous couture garments.


  3. Exquisite Corpse Collaboration

    July 10, 2016 by Erin Fletcher

    ExquisiteCorpse
    As Program Chair for the New England Chapter of the Guild of Book Workers, I had the pleasure of organizing a project brought to me by one of our members. Jonathan Romain, a recent graduate of the North Bennet Street School Bookbinding Program, brought forth the idea of a collaborative project between the students at NBSS and the NEGBW. I loved this idea and so with the help of instructor Jeffrey Altepeter, we put this plan in motion.

    An Exquisite Corpse is a method of illustration invented by Surrealists in the early 1910s, where each collaborator adds to a composition in sequence usually without seeing the prior portion. Upon reveal this rule to hide the previous sequences offers up an abstract and amusing portrait. Each student created a plaquette covered in neutral leather (we used Harmatan Terracotta and Brown goatskin) and also completed the “head” portion of the figure. The plaquette’s were about 18in x 6in; allowing each participant to cover a 6in square portion of the board.

    The project spanned over 3 months as each participant received and worked on their portion over the course of a month. At the end of May, the finished pieces were on display as part of NBSS’s Student & Alumni Show, an annual exhibit that showcases work from current students and alumni from the various programs.

    I had the pleasure of receiving the finished pieces and bringing them back to the students. We gathered around one another as each student revealed the unique and strange characters that developed over the course of the project. Each piece is displayed below with a brief description from each collaborator remarking on their concept and use of materials.

    Jeffrey Altepeter – Samuel Feinstein – Lang Ingalls

    JeffSamuelLang-Corpse
    Jeffrey Altepeter
    The robot head was inspired by my son’s fascination with mechanical and technological design and construction. It is made up of traditional leather decoration techniques—leather onlays, tooled with gold leaf, foil and carbon.


    Samuel Feinstein
    Chicago, IL

    Gold and blind tooling.


    Lang Ingalls
    Crested Butte, CO

    I opted for humor in my approach to the Exquisite Corpse. The design concept was to depict bird legs: the initial tests were for tooling in the positive; it became clear that the negative space would be more interesting. I used four sizes of “dots” in gold foil to produce the background behind the legs. Repetition and rhythm became the focal point.

    Emily Patchin – Barbara Adams Hebard – Athena Moore

    EmilyBarbaraAthena-Corpse Emily Patchin
    This head was created as an onlay piece. The main portion was cut out of navy blue goat skin, pared thin. The sections for the eye, ear, and ghosts were all cut out, and their edges beveled on the flesh-side. Light blue leather for the eye and ear were glued to the back before pasting to the base leather. The ghosts were cut out from parchment; their faces backed with thinly pared gold leather, and painted with watercolor before being glued in place. The outline of the original drawing was then blind tooled over the leather. The intention behind the design was to look at intense personal struggles (depression, intrusive thoughts, insomnia) through a lens of whimsy and humor.

    Barbara Adams Hebard
    Melrose, MA

    Melrose, MAWhite alum-tawed goatskin onlay with blind tooled details, inspired by the shape of an Early Cycladic marble female torso (2800-2300 BC, Keros-Syros Culture). Flanking the torso are shapes commonly found incised on Early Cycladic pottery, a spiral and a two-headed ax, executed in surface gilding.


    Athena Moore
    Somerville, MA

    My materials were leather and hand-cast paper (made by the artist). The concept was a bit literal, since I had the last portion and was finishing the body with the legs, but I was inspired by a particular set of medical prints from Yale’s collection.

    Jonathan Romain – Erin Fletcher – James Reid-Cunningham

    JonathanErinJamesJonathan Romain
    a shapeless face, 18 karat gold, palladium, and ascona onlay


    Erin Fletcher
    Boston, MA

    I wanted to created something really playful with my portion of the plaquette. When I saw no indication of where to begin, I chose to create a headless girl with comically long arms. The girl’s dress is a series of blind tooled onlays in pink and purple goatskin and white buffalo. Her skin is gold tooled. And the blood spurting from her headless stump is painted with red acrylic.


    James Reid-Cunningham
    Cambridge, MA

    The design is largely non-representational, with a vague suggestion of legs. Otherwise, there is no concept. Tooled in gold and metallic foil, with inset lines of white box calf.

    Mary Grace Whalen – Eric Alstrom – Penelope Hall

    MaryGraceEricPenelope-CorpseMary Grace Whalen
    Blue Pageboy, a leather tool-edged onlay made of goatskin is inspired by the Russian pioneer of geometric abstraction, Kazimir Malevich’s costume design and his Yellow Man painting. Blue Pageboy gives off a theatrical and mysterious vibe. Who is s/he? Only the body will tell!


    Eric Alstrom
    Okemos, MI

    After many ideas, I kept coming back to the idea of ancient Egypt and their exquisite corpses.  My design is based on various historic paintings, but did not copy any single on in particular. The design is made from various colors of goat painted with acrylics and blind tooled


    Penelope Hall
    Kingfield, ME

    Inlay consisting of glazed earthenware, scraps of Thai papers, and wheat paste. Colored with watercolor. Additional adhesives used are E-6000, and Jade 403 PVA. Finish coat on the inlay is SC 6000 acrylic polymer and wax emulsion.

    Nicole Campana – Jan Baker – Colin Urbina

    NicoleJanColin-Corpse

    Nicole Campana
    This design was inspired by nothing more than a common theme in much of my art: day and night. I’m drawn to the color palette each time presents and the way in which our perceptions of those colors change as the light does. The techniques utilized are predominantly onlays and gold tooling, however a variation of the lacunose technique and an Ascona tool were used for the hair.


    Jan Baker
    Providence, RI

    what i lost this year:
    – my ovaries
    – my fallopian tubes
    – my uterus
    – all of my hair
    – and my brother


    Colin Urbina
    Boston, MA

    When I’m sketching, I often come back to the roots of a plant. For this project I decided to attempt the same type of free flowing, loose, many-from-one nature of these sketches with traditional gouges. Using five or six tools I built up the legs of this plaquette, and then added acrylic paint into them that gets darker as the roots go lower. The dirt is represented by grain manipulation with sandpaper, changing the surface of the leather and giving it a different look and feel.

    Peggy Boston – John Nove – Shannon Kerner

    PeggyJohnShannon-Corpse

    Peggy Boston
    My inspiration for this project came from a group of mustachioed, high-collared, quirky members of the Viennese Secessionist art movement. This movement was part of the golden age of illustration and graphic design in Vienna and Germany from 1897 to 1918. Their main influences were derived from William Morris and the English Arts and Crafts movement which sought to bridge the applied and fine arts. The Secessionists favored hand-made object opposing machine techniques. Hand tooling and acrylic paint.


    John Nove
    South Deerfield, MA

    The initial description of the project attributed the Exquisite Corpse to the Surrealists. My concept was of a Magritte-ian gentleman – fine suit, hands crossed in the standard coffin pose holding the usual flower  — but then with an amphibian’s green gnarly ‘hands’. Carbon tooling and goatskin onlays.


    Shannon Kerner
    Easthampton MA

    The vivid colors on the chubby tum were used to inspire whimsy, as well as the funny shape of the legs, which took inspiration from the cartoon Invader Zim, a silly plot animation focusing on an alien sent to Earth and meant to blend in. Stars: gold and palladium mixed together is a challenging medium to tool as they are different weights, but the outcome is very rewarding and attractive. Leather onlays, gold and palladium tooling.

    Todd Davis – Jason Patrician – Jacqueline Scott

    ToddJasonJackie

    Todd Davis
    The design of this head is inspired by the sugar skulls used as part of the Mexican celebration of Dia de los Muertos (day of the dead). On that day, these skulls, made of sugar, are part of an altar made to honor and celebrate dead ancestors, particularly children. Blind tooled outline filled with raised, ascona, and back-pared onlays. It is finished with blind and lemon gold tooling, and surface gilded teeth.


    Jason Patrician
    New London, CT

    I wanted to stay true to the surrealist exercise of the exquisite corpse by combining the distorted human figure and nature. For my design I chose the octopus, the master of disguise, which doubles as the female torso. Leather onlays (Harmatan and Pergamena), vellum inlay (Pergamena) with walnut ink wash and Prismacolor marker detail, blind tooling throughout.


    Jacqueline Scott
    Somerville, MA

    Materials: goatskin leather, gold leaf
    Concept: I wanted my plaquette section to be whimsical and colorful and wanted to utilize the feathered onlay technique. Something about chicken legs appealed to me, so I ran with that, though I think they ended up looking more like reptile legs with funny leg warmers.

  4. Artist: Dennis Congdon

    February 10, 2016 by Erin Fletcher

    DennisCongdon2

    I love these abstract paintings from Dennis Congdon. His use of pastels against vibrant hues is engaging and dream-like. Each painting feels like a lost page from a graphic novel in which the story tells of displaced art and culture.

    DennisCongdon1 DennisCongdon4 DennisCongdon5 DennisCongdon3


  5. Artist: Devin Rutz

    August 26, 2015 by Erin Fletcher

    Manhattan-DevinRutz

    These illustrations from Devin Rutz are indeed illustrations and shouldn’t be mistaken for marbled paintings. Through these collaged ink drawings, Devin creates such a likeness to marbling. He even captures the dreamy, ethereal quality typically seen in marbling.

    Untitled3-DevinRutz Candy-DevinRutz Untitled2-DevinRutz Pluto-DevinRutz Untitled1-DevinRutz Raphael-DevinRutz


  6. Artist: Jeanne Gaigher

    August 25, 2015 by Erin Fletcher

    RecordedConversation2-JeanneGaigher

    Jeanne Gaigher is an emerging artist out of Cape Town, South Africa. Her expressive brush strokes and moody color palette are captivating. Her paintings remind me of the lacunose technique or perhaps a Philip Smith binding.

    RecordedConversation-JeanneGaigher

    HumidNight-JeanneGaigher

    Swamp-JeanneGaigher

    CloseUp-JeanneGaigher


  7. Artist: Tomma Abts

    August 5, 2015 by Erin Fletcher

    Hebo-TommaAbts

    The paintings of artist Tomma Abts are mesmerizing. She creates simple geometric designs that pop from the canvas with her use of flat textures and perfect shading. Another artist would could totally inspire the cover for a binding.

    Wybe-TommaAbts Feke-TommaAbts Teete-TommaAbts Jeles-TommaAbts Bilte-TommaAbts Ihne-TommaAbts


  8. Artist: Lily Stockman

    June 25, 2015 by Erin Fletcher

    LilyStockman2

    I love, love, love these paintings from Lily Stockman. After receiving a degree from Harvard University in painting and botany, Lily spent 5 months in Mongolia at an apprenticeship studying Buddhist thanga painting. Now she splits her time between the Mojave Desert and the Thar Desert in India, where she collaborates on textile paintings with her sister and a master block printer. What an awesome life!

    LilyStockman4 LilyStockman5 LilyStockman1 LilyStockman3


  9. Artist: David Samuel Stern

    June 23, 2015 by Erin Fletcher

    In this series, Woven Portraits, photographer David Samuel Stern wove together two photographs of the same subject printed on a transparent vellum. The results are quite fascinating and a bit eerie. Facial features are lost or hidden in the distortion forcing the viewer to fill in the gaps in order to reconstruct their images.


  10. Artist: Nicholas Schutzenhofer

    May 19, 2015 by Erin Fletcher

    Untitled4-NicholasSchutzenhofer

    These paintings are apart of Nicholas Schutzenhofer’s 2014 MFA Show from my alma mater the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. These large scale paintings incorporate a range of paint varieties such as egg tempera, oil and encaustic.

    I’m delighted by the busyness of each piece. My eye darts from side to side, following thick, squiggly strokes of bright colors (and I love bright colors!).

    Untitled-NicholasSchutzenhofer Untitled3-NicholasSchutzenhofer Untitled2-NicholasSchutzenhofer Untitled5-NicholasSchutzenhofer